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Keynote Lectures

Domain Modeling
Stephen Mellor, Freeter, United Kingdom

Data, Context, Situation - On the Usefulness of Semantic Layers for Designing Context-aware Systems
Daniela Nicklas, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, Germany

Empathy-driven Design for Emotional Wellbeing
Fabio Casati, University of Trento, Italy

Enterprise Ontology Driven Software Generation
Jan Dietz, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands

 

Domain Modeling

Stephen Mellor
Freeter
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Stephen J Mellor is an independent teacher and consultant focussed on methods for the construction of real-time and embedded systems. He is the author of Structured Development for Real-Time Systems (way back in 1985), Object Lifecycles, Executable UML, and MDA Distilled. He is also (perhaps surprisingly) a signatory to the Agile Manifesto. Until recently, he was Chief Scientist of the Embedded Software Division at Mentor Graphics, and founder and some-time president of Project Technology, Inc., before its acquisition. He participates in multiple UML/modeling related activities at the Object Management Group, and was a member of the OMG's Architecture Board, which is the final technical gateway for all OMG standards. Mr. Mellor was the Chairman of the Advisory Board to IEEE Software for ten years and a two-time Guest Editor of the magazine, most recently for an issue on Model-Driven Development. He is also adjunct professor at the Australian National University in Canberra, ACT, Australia.


Abstract
Tying together many aspects of software and system engineering is the concept of a subject matter or domain. Short visits to Mr Google and Ms Wiki reveal many near synonyms: conceptual model, ontology, problem domain, concerns, semantics, etc. Each term is defined within their own context: possibly equivalent, certain to be treated separately within, er, their own domains. Yet rarely do we see models of the domains in a system. Instead, we see--overwhelmingly--models of software or other implementation mechanisms. We often see appalling mixtures of domains in system models. This makes it difficult to work independently, ties an application unnecessarily to services, and makes subject matters difficult to reuse and compose. Even less do we see explicit discussion within projects of how best to select and organize the domains in a system and the relationships between them. The keynote presentation will discuss how to model the domains in a system, the relationships between them, and how to work with a domain chart on a project.



 

 

Data, Context, Situation - On the Usefulness of Semantic Layers for Designing Context-aware Systems

Daniela Nicklas
Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Daniela Nicklas is a Junior Professor for Database and Internet technologies at the Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg since 2008. Besides her research on context-aware applications and context modeling, she works on data stream processing and sensor-based systems within the application domains of transportation, energy, and ambient environments. She received her PhD (Dr. rer. nat.) in Computer Science 2008 from the University of Stuttgart, working within the Center of Collaboration (SFB 627) "Nexus" under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Bernhard Mitschang. The main contribution if her thesis was architecture and a spatial data model for large-scale integration of context data for location-based, mobile applications. After that, she worked for two years as PostDoc in that Center of Project, co-leading a project on context-aware workflows together with Prof. Dr. Frank Leymann. In 2008, she received an IBM Exploratory Stream Analytics Innovation award for "Data Stream Technology for Future Energy Grid Control". Besides being a committee member in many programme committees of pervasive computing and database conferences and workshops, she helped organizing international conference, like e.g., the Annual IEEE International Conferences on Pervasive Computing and Communications (PerCom) as Vice Program Chair in 2010. She is also a member of the editorial boards of the Elsevier Pervasive Computing and Communication Journal, the International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications (Emerald), and the Datenbankspektrum (German Journal on Databases).


Abstract
Context-aware applications adapt their behavior according to the current situation of their user or their (often physical) environment. This adaptation could be the change of the user interface, the performance of actions (like sending messages or triggering actuators), or the change of used resources (like network bandwidth or processing power). To determine relevant situations, many heterogeneous data sources could be used, ranging from sensor data over mined patterns in files to explicit user input. Since most sensors are not perfect, context quality has to be considered. And since many context-aware applications are mobile, the set of data sources changes during runtime. All this issues make context management and reasoning, and the development of correct adaptations within context-aware applications a challenging task. This keynote introduces a layered model to separate different tasks and concerns in designing data models for context-aware applications. It shows how existing works map to this layered model, and how the model can help in designing context aware applications that are better to maintain and safer to use.



 

 

Empathy-driven Design for Emotional Wellbeing

Fabio Casati
University of Trento
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Fabio Casati is Professor of Computer Science and Dean of the ICT Doctoral School at the University of Trento. He got his PhD from the Politecnico di Milano and then worked 7 years in HP USA, as the technical lead for the research program on business process intelligence. Fabio has also contributed to the development of several HP commercial products in the area of web services and business process management. In Trento, he is leading or participating to several FP7 projects, is active in many industry-funded projects, both local and international, and has over 30 granted patents. His passions are now in social informatics, or, informatics at the service of the community.


Abstract
In this talk I will discuss how to design applications that can help people, and specifically older adults, improve their emotional wellbeing - or, in bold terms, happiness. Despite the obvious importance of the topic and the terrific impact this line of research can have for society, it is surprising how little progress has been made in the last decade, both in terms of research and in terms of products. In the talk I will first elaborate on why this is the case and exemplify the main flaws in the design thinking process that led to the current state of affairs. I will then discuss how to approach the design of applications for emotional wellbeing, stressing that the key is the need for every single designer and programmer to develop empathy with the people they are trying to help. I will then move on to discuss which are the main characteristics an application should possess, introduce some example applications and report on experiments, results, and findings in different contexts.



 

 

Enterprise Ontology Driven Software Generation

Jan Dietz
Delft University of Technology
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Jan L.G. Dietz is emeritus full professor in Information Systems Design at Delft University of Technology, full professor in Enterprise Engineering at Delft University of Technology, and director of Sapio (www.sapio.nl). He holds a Master degree in Electrical Engineering and a Doctoral degree in Computer Science. He has published over 200 scientific and professional articles and books. His current research interests are in the emerging discipline of Enterprise Engineering, of which Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Ontology, and Enterprise Governance are the major pillars. Before his academic career, he has practiced application software engineering for ten years in industry. Jan Dietz is the spiritual father of DEMO (Design & Engineering Methodology for Organizations), and honorary chairman of the Enterprise Engineering Institute (www.ee-institute.com). For the development of Enterprise Engineering, he chairs the international research network CIAO! (www.ciaonetwork.org). He also acts as editor-in-chief of a book series on Enterprise Engineering, published by Springer. For more information, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Dietz


Abstract
Model Driven Engineering has been with us for quite some time, the most well known approach being OMG's Model Driven Architecture. However, although it has brought substantial benefits compared to other software engineering approaches, Model Driven Engineering presently still suffers from two major shortages. First, it is unable to deliver domain models from which the correct functional requirements can be derived. Hence, true validation is hardly possible: the software does not meet user expectations. Second, the models to be produced during the system development process, are not formally defined. Hence, their verification remains a cumbersome task. One of the theoretical pillars of Enterprise Engineering (EE) is the Generic System Development Process. It distinguishes between the using system and the object system (the system to be built), and it states that any software development process should start from the ontological construction model of the using system. In addition, EE’s systemic notion of Enterprise Ontology offers a formalized ontological model of an enterprise that satisfies the C4E quality criteria (coherent, consistent, comprehensive, concise, and essential). An operational application software generator will be presented that takes this ontological model, with some extensions, as source code input and executes the model as a professional software application. Changes in the software, as required by any agile enterprise, are brought about ‘on the fly’, through re-generation, based on the modified ontological model of the enterprise.



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